Comments please – canvassing ideas for birth baths

At a recent conference attended by Ruth, a German midwife recounted how she used a much deeper container as a waterbirth pool .  With this in mind, what do you, midwives and birth practitioners, think.  It is not the bath that Ruth is stood in, rather its something to indicate depth.  We have a design but there’s no point going into production if there is no call.  Alternatively, we might start making it for the export market.  Do let us know you thoughts.

ruth new deep bath2 ruth new deep bath

Legionnaires Disease and Water Birth – An Update.

Please be clear this alert is NOT for baths and birthing pools filled from domestic or hospital hot water systems which are then emptied or pumped out when cooled or used.

This IS for heater filter units which re-circulate warm water.

This is not about these circulatory systems being innately dangerous either – just that the sanitization and effectiveness of all units now have to be checked to ensure safety before being hired out or used.

There is a potential for contamination if the unit is not fully disinfected, or the unit is not working properly or the users do not follow the strict instructions.

Investigation is under way. So, if you have one, lend one, or hire one, then contact your local Health and Safety Dept at your local authority to get advice on ensuring this awful situation does not happen to you, a loved one, or a customer.
Every good wish
Ruth@Aquabirths

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/alert-after-legionnaires-disease-case-in-baby
Press Release Text:
Public Health England (PHE) and NHS England have temporarily advised against the home use of birthing pools with built-in heaters and recirculation pumps, potentially filled up to 2 weeks in advance of the birth. This follows a single case of Legionnaires’ disease identified in a baby born in this specific type of birthing pool at home. The baby is currently receiving intensive care treatment in hospital.
Samples taken from the heated birthing pool used have confirmed the presence of legionella bacteria, which cause Legionnaires’ disease. Tests are ongoing to establish if it is the same strain which infected the baby. This is the first reported case of Legionnaires’ disease linked to a birthing pool in England, although there have been 2 cases reported internationally some years ago.
NHS England has today issued a Patient Safety Alert rapidly notifying the healthcare system – and specifically midwives – to the possible risks associated with the use of these heated birthing pools at home. The alert recommends that heated birthing pools, filled in advance of labour and where the temperature is maintained by use of a heater and pump, are not used for labour or birth. In the meantime, a full risk assessment into their use is being carried out.
The majority of birthing pools used at home are filled from domestic hot water systems at the time of labour – these birthing pools do not pose the same risk and are excluded from this alert. There are no concerns about these types of pools as long as pumps are used solely to empty the pool and not for recirculation of warm water.
Professor Nick Phin, PHE’s head of Legionnaires’ disease, said:
This is an extremely unusual situation, which we are taking very seriously. As a precaution, we advise that heated birthing pools, filled in advance of labour and where the temperature is then maintained by use of a heater and pump, are not used in the home setting, while we investigate further and until definitive advice on disinfection and safety is available.
We do not have concerns about purchased or hired pools that are filled from domestic hot water supplies at the onset of labour, provided that any pumps are used solely for pool emptying.
PHE and relevant local authorities are investigating the infection control measures required for this type of birthing pool and local authorities will be working with the small number of companies who supply these heated birthing pools for use at home.
Louise Silverton, director for midwifery at the Royal College of Midwives, said:
Women planning birth at home using a traditional pool that is filled when the woman is in labour or using a fixed pool in an NHS unit are not affected by this alert and should not be concerned. Birthing pools in hospitals are subject to stringent infection control procedures and monitoring. Home birthing pools filled during labour come with disposable liners and are only in place for a relatively short time period, reducing opportunity for bacterial growth.  Any women with concerns about using home birthing pools should contact their midwife or local maternity unit.
Legionnaires’ disease is extremely rare in childhood, with only 1 case in children aged 0 to 9 years reported in England between 1990 to 2011.The infection does not spread from person-to-person – people become infected with the bacteria through inhalation of contaminated water droplets.

Chic-looking Compact Birth Baths

Dunoon compact birth pool

The Dunoon model compact birth bath installed at Royal University Hospital, Bath as part of their refurbishments, which were envisioned and overseen by SR Architects.  The Dunoon model is designed to keep all the room of a birth bath for the mum-to-be but to be efficient in its use of space.  If you have small birth room or space is tight, then the Dunoon birthing pool is ideal.  And with a price tag well under £3000, it is also suitable for hospitals that need to fit out several birthpool rooms.  As with all Aquabirths baths, this bath can be customised and is flexible in its design – the hatch can go either side, it can be fitted side-on or end on.  And, as with all our baths, it is a one-piece bath with a single-surface for strength and superior hygiene control.

Caseloading Community Midwifery

A very useful paper according to none other than Beverley Beech.  More evidence (as if more were needed!) for the need for caseloading community midwifery.  The link below is to the article of the same name as the title of this blog post.

BMJ Qual Saf-2013-Rance-bmjqs-2012-001295

It can also be found on the blog Bornstroppy.

Bradford Royal Infirmary & the Canberra Birth Bath

Birth Rooms by AQB Pools Ltd A couple more pictures from the opening of the new Birth Centre and Bradford Royal Infirmary.

The hospital now has several of the Canberra model birth baths each in its own beautiful new birth room.  The Canberra birth bath is designed to be universal in that it can fit into most rooms and situations.   It is available on short lead times or from stock and costs well under £5000 (and discounts for 2 or more baths).

The photos came from Lorne Campbell / Guzelian.

Bradford Royal Infirmary

Bradford Birthcentre’s successful launch

It was the launch of the Bradford Birth Centre on 1st February 2013 – already over 280 babies had been born there.  Feedback from Mums is fantastic, the birth pools (which Aquabirths supplied) are in constant use, and the rooms are beautiful.