Installing a Birthing Bath

professionally installed birthing pool

There is no mystery to installing a birthing bath.  In may ways they are simpler than domestic baths because our baths are one-piece Single -Surface baths.  Midwives designed the bath from the top down, and plumbers designed it from the bottom up!

Usually, the bath arrives into a near-finished room.  Plumbing should already been in place behind an IPS panel.  All that should be visible is a small piece of 40mm solvent weld pipe protruding from the very bottom of the IPS (or no more than 25mm from the floor).  Taps are in place by this stage too.

In terms of taps, we don’t recommend any, but have a short guide sheet (pdf).  We know taps from the Ideal Bluebook range are commonly used.  For example, one Trust repeatedly favoured using two of the following so that there was a double supply of mixed supply hot water.  The reason being that 22mm taps that are HTM compliant are very difficult to source and a 15mm tap would take too long to fill the bath.  http://www.idealspec.co.uk/catalogue/bluebook/brassware/contract/contour-21/contour-21-single-control-mixer-and-15-23cm-spout_p351.html

Rada Sensor taps are also very popular.

  Looking in through the hatch, the finished pipe work should look like this.  The valve should be as close to the hatch door as possible so that the midwives are not having to reach right in under the bath.  The valve is supplied with the bath.  The pipe either side of the valve must be clamped to support the valve and to stop the pipework being twisted by the constant use of the valve.

Anyway, first things first.  This is a 2-3 person job – you’ll see why.  When we install a bath, we put down lots of padding and tip the bath on its side onto the padding.  This way, we can, using a long level or straight edge, adjust the feet to match the base of the pool.  The bath is designed to sit both on the basal rim of the bath and on the feet.  This is why our baths are so good at spreading the load.  If you don’t think you can put the pool on its side without scratching it, don’t – the warranty doesn’t cover it.

It is also easier to silicone in place the waste and, if ordered, the LED lights. The latter are fitted in the same way as a waste – a backnut and a lot of silicone!  Once all that’s done, carefully turn the bath back onto its base.

Offer up the end of the bath to the IPS.  This way, you’ll see where the waste pipe will come through the end of the bath.  mark and drill it out.

First to go on the tail of the waste is an elbow and the waterless trap.  The Hepworth vO is a good choice but other versions are now available.  Do  not use a U-bend or shower trap.  They hold water which will just become a source of infection issues.

ideal pipe bends
Avoid sudden 90 degree corners in the pipe run.

 

 

Next comes the valve and the remaining piperun to join on to the piece of 40mm pipe protruding through the base of the IPS (and through the end of the bath you’ve just drilled!).  Don’t glue the pipework before you’ve tried it all in place.  You may want to mark where the clamps either side of the valve are to go.  It is easier to pull the bath back, drill and then put it in place.  Finish the pipework.

Screw the bath to the IPS and, through flanges on the base in the hatch area, to the floor.  Silicone round.

Proper Installation of Birthing Pools and False Economies.

I doubt if there is a maternity unit in the UK that isn’t strapped for funds.  Savings always need to be found!  But please don’t scrimp on the installation of the birthing bath – this is a job for a qualified plumber and not a general fitter.   This is not a way of pushing our installation service but simply because we’ve just had to tidy up a mess left by a contractor who didn’t install the bath properly.

It is very important that the bath you have bought, paid to be delivered and installed is put in properly to avoid extra costs and problems down the line.  Make sure Estates or someone ensures the contractor follows the instructions.  If you have queries, ring us.  You could have a site visit before hand so that we can discuss installation; you can also  book for our plumber to be present at installation to offer guidance, at the very least, you could arrange for him to be present to give phone support.  The cost of a site visit (which is only for mileage and time) is discounted from the purchase price (up to a maximum of £200) in any case.

We understand that hospitals will want to make saving where they can but, as we know with a local hospital, the installer put the bath in wrongly and with no consideration of the midwives who will have to use it.  This has caused extra expense, hassle and time-wastage trying to sort it.  Othertimes, the incorrect trap has been used so that Infection Control are unhappy.